Review – Every Day is for the Thief by Teju Cole.

9bef1dbf-81db-43ab-94df-139bc6aa6779.jpegTeju Cole travels back to visit his hometown Lagos in Nigeria after living in the States for fifteen years. He gets off the plane, faces dirt, poverty and corruption but also memories from his past.

Through short vignettes, the author creates a vibrant portrait of the city’s culture, its infrastructure, customs and traditions. The first night he arrives, the power goes out and he lies in the dark, the noise of generators filling the neighbourhood. It sets the tone for this book, which is an account of what he experiences during his stay. These accounts are like searchlights illuminating different and sometimes violent aspects of the city. Ranging from corruption and economic realities to the treatment of the history of slavery, Cole looks at many fragments that make up this city. He visits his first girlfriend, goes to museums, bookshops and concerts. As he travels through the city we also get a sense of how he sees his home after a long absence. America has changed him and therefore his perception of Nigeria. As a reader I found this very interesting, not only does it touch on themes of national identity, immigration and belonging but it also gave me a self-reflected insight view into Lagos life.

Even though I have read novels by Nigerian authors before, this particular book helped me understand and see some of the issues the inhabitants of this city face much clearer. The reality of being an artist in Lagos is something that I haven’t read about before. The struggles that people face on a daily basis, the violence and noise, the sheer amount of people takes a toll on everyone and it becomes a difficult setting in which to create art. This made me see other Nigerian books in a very different light. I could appreciate their accomplishments even more.

I lie in bed, on my back, wearing only boxer shorts, enduring the late afternoon’s damp heat. I have headphones on, and I am listening to “Giant Steps” […]. It is at high volume , but the generators say, No, you will not enjoy this. I have no right to Coltrane here, not with everything else going on. This is Lagos. I disagree, turn the volume up, listen to both the music and the noise. Neither gives way. No sense emerges of the combat between art and messy reality.

Chigozie Obioma – The Fishermen

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The novel is told from the perspective of one of the (now adult) brothers and can be read in many ways. On the surface it is the story of a family, the father takes on a job in another city and the dynamic of the household changes drastically. Then one day the brothers receive a deadly prophecy and their lives are forever changed. But the story is also a snapshot of Nigerian politics, a fairy tale, a fable, a crime- and coming of age story. Many times Obioma is questioning the prophecy through his characters but he still leaves room for imagination. Even though a sentence like:

“you are all doing this to yourself because of your fear”

seems rational at times, at others I found myself being drawn into his mystical world of curses and visions and am not so sure what to believe.